Family planning services

for women and men

throughout Indiana.

STD Testing


When it comes to STDs, did you know?

  • Young people age 15-24 acquire nearly HALF of all new STDs.
  • In 2014, there were over 28,000 cases of chlamydia in Indiana.
  • About 80%–90% of chlamydia infections and up to 80% of gonorrhea infections in women are asymptomatic (shows no symptoms)
  • Chlamydia and gonorrhea are easily preventable, but if left untreated can lead to complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease which can cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy
  • Having an STD can increase your chances of getting another STD or HIV/AIDS.
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is a leading cause of cervical cancer in women.

Below we have listed some STDs, how they are contracted and their symptoms. If you’ve had unprotected sex, have a new partner (or more than one partner), or for any reason are worried you have been exposed to an STD, talk to your healthcare provider about getting tested. Indiana Family Health Council funded clinics will provide testing, counseling, and condoms in a confidential and caring manner.

Chlamydia

What is Chlamydia? This STD can infect both men and women and can cause serious, permanent damage to a woman’s reproductive system. The damage can make it difficult or impossible for her to get pregnant later on.

How do you get it? You can get the disease by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has chlamydia.  If your partner is male, you can still get chlamydia if he does not ejaculate (cum).

How can I reduce my risk? One way to to reduce your risk is abstaining from any sexual activity. However, if you are sexually active you can reduce your risks of chlamydia by using a condom every time you have sex and making sure you and your partner are regularly tested for STDs.

What are the symptoms? For women, symptoms can include: an abnormal discharge and/or a burning sensation when urinating. Symptoms for men can include: a discharge from their penis, a burning sensation when urinating and pain and swelling in one or both testicles (although this is less common).

Can it be cured? Yes. Please contact one of our Title X clinics if you think you may be infected to get treatment as soon as possible.

Gonorrhea

What is gonorrhea? This STD affects both men and women and can cause infection in the genitals, rectum and throat. It is a very common infection, especially among young people ages 15-24 years old.

How do you get it? By having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has gonorrhea. A pregnant woman with the disease can pass it to her baby during childbirth.

How can I reduce my risk? One way to  reduce your risk is to abstain from any sexual activity such as vaginal, anal and oral sex. If you are having sex, you need to use a condom each time you have sex to reduce your risk.

What are the symptoms? Some men with gonorrhea may have no symptoms at all. However, those who do have symptoms may have the following: a burning sensation when urinating, a white, yellow or green discharge from the penis, painful or swollen testicles (although this is less common). Women may also not experience symptoms and even when they do, they are often mild and can be mistaken for a bladder or vaginal infection. Symptoms for women can include the following: painful or burning sensation when urinating, increased vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding between periods.

Can it be cured? Yes, with the right treatment it can be cured. If you suspect you might have gonorrhea please contact one of our Title X clinics to get tested.

Genital Herpes

What is genital herpes? Herpes is a very common STD that any sexually active person can contract. The disease is caused by two types of viruses: herpes simplex type 1 and herpes simplex type 2. There is also oral herpes, which is caused by HSV-1 and can result in a cold sore or fever blisters on or around the mouth.

How do you get it? You can get herpes by having vaginal, anal and/or oral sex with someone who has the disease. If  you have oral herpes, it can be spread from the mouth to the genitals through oral sex. You can also get herpes if you come into contact with the virus through a herpes sore, saliva, genital secretions, skin in the oral area if your partner has an oral herpes infection or skin in the genital area if your partner has a genital herpes infection.You can also get herpes from a partner who does not have a visible sore, and it is also possible to get genital herpes if you receive oral sex from a partner who has oral herpes.

How can I reduce my risk?  One way to reduce your risk of herpes is to abstain from  vaginal, anal or oral sex. However, if you are sexually active you can reduce your risks of genital herpes by using a condom every time you have sex and making sure you and your partner are regularly tested for STDs. For more information about herpes go to the Center for Disease Control site.

What are the symptoms? Most people have no symptoms or very mild symptoms. Herpes sores usually appear as one or more blisters to or around the genitals, rectum or mouth.

Can it be cured? No, there is no cure for herpes. However, medicines can prevent or shorten outbreaks.

Syphilis

What is syphilis? It is a highly contagious disease that can cause serious health problems if not treated.

How do you get it? You can get syphilis by direct contact with a syphilis sore during vaginal, anal and/or oral sex. You can find sores inside the rectum, on the lips, in the mouth and the genital area.

How can I reduce my risk? Abstaining from any sexual activity is one way to reduce your risk.  However, if you are sexually active you can reduce your risk by using a condom every time you have sex and making sure you and your partner are regularly tested for STDs.

What are the symptoms? There are three stages of syphilis and symptoms vary with each stage. However, in some cases, there can be no symptoms for several years. The states are primary, secondary, latent, tertiary (late) and congenital.

Can it be cured? Yes. Please contact one of our Title X clinics if you think you may be infected to get treatment as soon as possible.

HIV/AIDS

What is HIV/AIDS?  The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), if left untreated. AIDS is the most severe phase of HIV infection.

How do you get it? HIV is spread through contact with blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum) rectal and vaginal fluids.

How can I reduce my risk? Having anal or vaginal sex without using a condom puts you at a higher risk for contracting HIV. In addition, sharing needs or syringes with infected persons also plays a role in risk factors with HIV transmission. You can reduce your risk of HIV by not engaging in any sexual activity. However, if you are sexually active make sure you you use  a condom every time you have sex and get regularly tested for STDs.

What are the symptoms? There are two stages of HIV, which if not treated can lead to the progression of AIDS. During the early stage of HIV, about 40 to 90 percent have flu-like symptoms within two to four weeks after an HIV infection. Sometimes, people do not feel sick at all during this stage. Those with symptoms may have them from a few days to a few weeks. For more information on symptoms go to HIV.gov.

Can it be cured? Currently, there is not cure for HIV. However, the disease can be controlled with proper medical care.  If you think you have been infected with HIV, please contact one of our clinics to be tested and for more information.

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Indiana Family Health Council

151 N. Delaware St., Suite 520

Indianapolis, IN 4604

Phone: 317-247-9151

Fax: 317-247-9159

This web site was partially funded by a grant from the US Dept of Health & Human Services (DHHS). The information, comments and views on this web site are the sole responsibility of the Indiana Family Health Council. ©2016 Indiana Family Health Council, All Rights Reserved.